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Monday, November 22, 2010

PC Desk

One of my tasks for yesterday was to accommodate my desktop computer in another room. First step: somewhere to put it. Of course with the Studio not yet finished, there's no more space in the living room than there used to be. By rights I should be waiting until I've moved some things out of there before moving anything else in. But waiting never was my favourite activity. And at least if the computer's all set up in its new home it will remain functional when moving chaos happens, hopefully next weekend. Besides, I was so proud of myself, having cleared four boxes of stuff out of the shed with hardly a blink of regret, that I felt I deserved a more constructive task.

Off I went to the Office Superstore. I've had my eye on this little desk for a while. It seems sturdy enough and inexpensive. I don't really want a lot of visual clutter in the living space--those of you who are familiar with the current state of my house: here's your cue to laugh out loud! Of course the desk came flat-packed. Here it is now in 3-D. And don't ask me why the pic is sideways . . . it's one of those blogger days. At the moment the only personal thing about it is my greasy fingerprints all over the glass. I pride myself on being better than average at assembling bits and pieces from cryptic diagrams. This one nearly had my stumped. Most of the assembly was reasonably straightforward, but there's a clever little keyboard drawer below the main desk surface. That drawer is on tracks with ball bearings--all fine and dandy. According to the diagrams, that mechanism needs to be pulled apart: one part is attached to the drawer surface and the other to the main desk piece. Later on the assembled drawer is slipped into place. It's a while since I studied probability and statistics in maths, but I can tell you from personal experience that two slide-mechanisms, each with two components can be put together in a squillion different combinations and permutations, only one of which is correct! I tried all but one of those combinations yesterday afternoon. I couldn't get it right. I decided to use the walk away technique. This is an approach you won't find in any technical manual. It involves taking a deep breath, calmly laying down your tools and leaving the job to another day. This morning I came back to it fresh after breakfast and a nice cup of coffee. I didn't bother looking at the instructions again. I pulled the drawer mechanism apart and tried fitting the components together without the extra hassle of the drawer and desk getting in my way. Snap! they clicked together easily. I heaved a sigh of relief and just hung on to what I'd done. Then I re-attached them in the right place without letting go of those pieces. Mission accomplished. I have a neat little PC desk. Now my next task is to pull my computer apart and put it back together in its new location. Maybe I'll leave that task until tomorrow.

6 comments:

Ang Pang said...

That's almost the exact desk that Steve had in our previous house! Only negative- your computer cords are visible

Textile Tragic said...

Ah yes, but I did see some clever gizmos for keeping cords tidy--and maybe I could even do something creative with them:)

Vireya said...

Blogger has driven me crazy at times by re-orienting portrait photos to landscape. I tilted the camera for a reason, Blogger!

However, I have found that if I reduce the width of any portrait photo to less than 1000 pixels, Blogger won't "helpfully" rotate it for me.

Textile Tragic said...

You're obviously more dedicated to the task than I am. When it's oriented one way in my Pictures folder and the opposite way in my blog I just sigh and let it go--or delete the picture and start again, which sometimes helps and sometimes doesn't. Oh well . . .

Vireya said...

Of course I realised after I sent that, that the problem here is not a portrait photo oriented as landscape, but the other way around, which I have no clue how to fix, sorry!

Textile Tragic said...

That's OK--there have to be some mysteries in life!